Steve Bryson, PhD, science writer —

Steve holds a PhD in biochemistry from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto, Canada. As a medical scientist for 18 years, he worked in both academia and industry, where his research focused on the discovery of new vaccines and medicines to treat inflammatory disorders and infectious diseases. Steve is a published author in multiple peer-reviewed scientific journals and a patented inventor.

Articles by Steve Bryson

Better outcomes seen after switch to Nexviazyme from Lumizyme

Switching from Lumizyme (alglucosidase alfa) to Nexviazyme (avalglucosidase alfa) was shown to improve breathing and motor function for most people with late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD) in a small real-world study. Many of the improvements, such as those seen in walking ability, were minimal, and did not reach…

Disease severity varies widely in LOPD gene therapy screening

Disease severity varied widely among adults with late-onset Pompe disease who underwent screening to assess their eligibility to participate in a gene therapy clinical trial, a study reports. Elevated levels of antibodies against the viral delivery vector were one of the exclusion criteria, suggesting that future studies may use…

Damage to muscle spindles may cause Pompe motor problems

Motor problems in people with Pompe disease may be explained by damage to muscle spindles, which are sensory receptors that detect muscle movement and help regulate muscle tone and maintain posture, a mouse study suggested. Muscle spindle structure and function were “severely compromised” in Pompe mice, resulting in a…

Pombiliti, ERT part of AT-GAA, approved in EU for LOPD

Pombiliti (cipaglucosidase alfa), a component of AT-GAA, a two-part investigational therapy, has been approved to treat adults with late-onset Pompe disease (LOPD) in the European Union. The European Commission (EC) ruling comes on the heels of a positive opinion issued by the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human…

Desensitization regimen can help manage anaphylaxis to Myozyme

Anaphylaxis, a severe allergic reaction, occurred in nearly one-third of children with Pompe disease treated with the enzyme replacement therapy Myozyme (alglucosidase alfa) in a small study. However, rapid desensitization regimens — using small doses initially and then increasing the doses — safely re-established tolerance to Myozyme in…

Pompe Mouse Model Targets Southern Han Chinese Ancestry

Researchers created and characterized an infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD) mouse model that carried a genetic defect commonly found among people with Southern Han Chinese ancestry, a study reported. The model recapitulated most of the signs and symptoms of IOPD and, according to researchers, is ideal to evaluate potential IOPD…

Brain White Matter Abnormalities Found in Pompe Despite Treatment

An MRI-based study found that progression of white matter involvement in the brain among patients with infantile-onset Pompe disease (IOPD) occurred at different rates and correlated with cognitive decline — despite ongoing treatment. White matter abnormalities also were tied to elevated bloodstream levels of the neurofilament light chain (NfL)…